Sex Trafficking = Slavery

So, during the past three weeks I read a few articles on  sex trafficking and the Super Bowl. Of course, the Super Bowl is not responsible for human/sex trafficking, but research has shown that the number of sex  trafficking cases hike during such big sporting events. Traffickers  use the opportunity to make money by selling to the people traveling to the area for the game. The recruitment of victims increases with the sudden increase of demand. These days, transactions can even be made online. The articles focused on the initiatives taken by government officials, volunteers, and non-profit organizations (such as SOAP/Save Our Adolescents from Prostitution) to raise awareness about the issue. Most importantly, teaching hotels’ staff how to identify sex trafficking victims. That said, I quickly read some of the comments after the articles and found myself sadden by how little people seem to know about the problem. There are many myths and misconceptions about the subject. Therefore, I decided to write this post in an attempt to clear out some confusion.

Sex Trafficking vs. Prostitution. Sex trafficking is not your average prostitution case. Of course, when we think of prostitution, we usually think of willful prostitution. We think the men or women practicing prostitution have come to this position willfully, on his/her own. Well, unfortunately, this is not always true. It’s important to distinguish the two. Sex trafficking is not your “willful” prostitution case. Sex trafficking or human trafficking is a form of slavery, physical, mental, and emotional.

Sex Trafficking can happen everywhere. We always want to think that these cases happen in far away countries or to over people, but this is not the case. The perpetrators of such crime do not discriminate between the rich or the poor. They do not discriminate based on the color of your skin or the language you speak.

There are many spectrums of human trafficking, including, but not limited to:

 Trafficking in women for sexual exploitation / Sex Trafficking. An organized network, where women are forced or blackmailed into sexual slavery and held in inhumane conditions and constant fear.

Trafficking for forced labour. They are recruited and trafficked using deception and coercion and find themselves held in conditions of slavery in a variety of jobs.

Commercial sexual exploitation of children in tourism. This crime type has been apparent in Asia for many years and has now taken hold in Africa as well as Central and South America. The phenomenon is promoted by the growth of inexpensive air travel and the relatively low risk of prohibition and prosecution in these destinations for engaging in sexual relations with minors.

 Trafficking in organs. Trafficking in humans for the purpose of using their organs, in particular kidneys, is a rapidly growing field of criminal activity. The health of victims, even their lives, is at risk as operations may be carried out in clandestine conditions with no medical follow-up.

Human trafficking happens every day, not just during sporting events. Human trafficking is slavery. Remember to keep an eye out and spread the word. Talk to friends about it, you never know who might need the information. If you are a victim of human trafficking, call the hotline at 1-888-373-7888 or text BeFree (233733).

I hope everyone has a nice weekend. Stay safe, enjoy the Super Bowl and remember to keep an eye out. Good Luck.

Thanks for reading,

Steph

For more information:

Super Bowl Surge in Sex Trafficking

Sex Trafficking in New York City & New Jersey

The Lovely, One Lovely Blog Award

I came back from vacation and found out that I’ve been nominated for the Lovely Blog Award. Big thanks to Sabrina at The Urban Book Thief for the nomination. I’m excited and flattered at the same time. I’m happy to know that someone likes my posts. I never thought I would be nominated for any blog award of any type. Can I still call myself a rookie blogger? I think, yes. Nonetheless, it is great to know that I’m not doing bad.

Now let’s get close and personal. I get to reveal seven random facts about myself and the chance to nominate seven other blogger for the Lovely Blog Award.

1 is the number of lights in my room.

2. I love rainy days when I get to stay home in the company of a good book and hot chocolate.

3. My interest in the science fiction and fantasy genres started at the age of nine.

4. I re-watch one of the following movies when I feel sad: Stranger than Fiction (directed my Marc Foster), Wonder Woman (Lauren Montgomery), and 50 First Dates (Peter Segal). I’m still trying to figure out why, but these are my feel-good movies.

5. I speak two and a half languages.

6. I once owned a dog named Felix. She was wonderful.

7 is one of my favorite numbers.

Alright, here are my nominations for the Lovely Blog Award:

These bloggers work really hard. I genuinely believe they deserve this award. At the same time, I wish I could re-nominate Sabrina. She is a fantastic blogger, please check out her blog. Thank you so much!

Best,

Steph

 

Random Thoughts

Random Thoughts: Humanity & Our Future 

(Perhaps not the best tittle)

The end of the year approaches and I realize that I will remember 2012 as a sad and sometimes painful year. I had my share of personal loses, including the lost of a loving grandfather.

I wanted to post something new for a while now. However, I couldn’t find it in myself to post a book review or a movie review without acknowledging our losses. I wouldn’t have been able to forgive myself.

This is the thing about humanity. These tragedies occurred, but we can’t lose faith in ourselves. One hundred years from now we will be remembered by all the things we did for those who come after us. We won’t be remembered collectively, not individually.

We have the power to shape the future, through the pen or through our voices, but these voices might have to become one voice in order to create any change at all.

My point is… Be kind to each other…

Note: Happy Holidays and I hope all of you are well. Take Care

Thanks for reading,

Steph